Amy Scott-Pillow
Moylin Chong, pictured in her studio. Image courtesy of a space arts.
Moylin Chong

The Contemporary Gallery

The re-opening of GHT marks an auspicious occasion, as this will be the first time in its history the building is open to the public as an art gallery and heritage venue.

‘a space’ arts remains committed to supporting local artists, and we are thrilled to present work by two recent graduates for the second exhibition in the Contemporary Gallery. These emerging artists from Hampshire will show work that explores the theme for 2019 / 2020, GHT: Beside the Sea.

Amy Scott-Pillow / Moylin Chong, Saturday 25th January – Sunday 15th March 2020

 

Island Room by Amy Scott-Pillow
Saturday 25th January – Sunday 15th March
FREE
Amy Scott-Pillow’s practice is informed by her family history, which is deeply rooted in Southampton. Drawing inspiration and imagery from local archives, Amy’s installation includes recreated interiors and objects from the ballrooms of luxury liners, which her grandfather furnished when he worked as a coach-trimmer for P&O Cruises in the 60s and 70s. The work explores the relationship between these grandiose interiors, the tradesmen who built them and the passengers who enjoyed their luxurious surroundings.

Children of Ancasta by Moylin Chong

Saturday 25th January – Sunday 15th March
FREE
Moylin Chong’s sculptures are made with natural materials, which she collects from the shores of Southampton. The work is inspired by oral histories, myths and folklore about deities and guardians which protect our land and coast. Over the centuries, as different nationalities and cultures came to Southampton and shared their own stories and artefacts, these additional, intangible histories became known to us too. By retelling these stories using materials scavenged by the sea, Moylin invites us to reconnect with the coast and our cultural heritage.

Workshops with Amy 

Workshops with Moylin 

GHT pictured circa 1900. The timeball on the Tower was connected to Greenwich, and dropped at midday to let sea traders know the time.